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Glass Recycling FAQs

From windows to pickle jars, glass is everywhere – find answers to common questions about glass recycling below.

No. Broken glass is hazardous to the workers who collect and sort your recyclables.

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Some charities and optometrists collect used eyeglasses for use in developing countries. Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Plate glass, including glass from windows, picture frames, furniture, and glassware, is not included in the curbside recycling programs in BC because these types of glass have a different chemical composition and manufacturing process than container glass.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Appliance Recycling FAQs

There are recycling programs in BC for small appliances, large appliances, and electrical outdoor power equipment. Find answers to some of the most common questions about these items below!

Many local landfills and transfer stations are equipped to recycle fridges and freezers. The units can also be picked up by private disposal companies for a fee, and a few municipalities in B.C. offer free pick-up of fridges and freezers.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Electric outdoor power equipment is included in a provincial recycling program, managed by the Outdoor Power Equipment Institute of Canada (OPEIC). Included in this program are electric lawn mowers, trimmers, tillers, chain saws, and other equipment. For a complete list of accepted items, visit the OPEIC website. These items are accepted free of charge at a number of recycling depots across the province. To find your nearest drop off facility, visit the OPEIC Depot Locator, contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline, or check the RCBC Recyclepedia.

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The Canadian Electrical Stewardship Association (CESA) manages a province-wide recycling program for small electrical appliances called ElectroRecycle, which includes countertop microwaves. Built-in or over-the-range microwaves, however, are not included in this program and are part of the Major Appliance Recycling Roundtable (MARR) program instead.

Visit the ElectroRecycle website for a list of drop off locations for countertop microwaves, or visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for microwaves of all types.

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Electrical appliances and power tools can be recycled through the ElectroRecycle program, which is run by the Canadian Electrical Stewardship Association (CESA). Small appliances can be dropped off for free at a number of ElectroRecycle depots across the Province. There are over 400 small appliances covered under the program.

For a complete list, visit the ElectroRecycle website. Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Some municipalities offer bulky item pick-up services or spring clean-up programs for residents. Large appliances, such as washers, dryers and dishwashers, are usually included in these programs and can be picked up for free. Private recycling or disposal companies can also be hired to haul away the appliances for you. The BC Hydro “Fridge Buy-Back Program” has been permanently discontinued.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Metal Recycling FAQs

Both ferrous and non-ferrous metals are routinely recycled at landfills, transfer stations, dedicated scrap metal recycling facilities, and even some recycling depots! Find answers to common questions about metal recycling here.

Empty refillable and non-refillable propane tanks are accepted at most landfills and transfer stations for recycling as scrap metal.

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For recycling metal coat hangers, one option may be to go through a local dry cleaner or thrift store.

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Empty aerosol spray cans, including those for food, air fresheners, shaving cream, hairspray and textile sprays, are included in a provincial recycling program, managed by Recycle BC. To ensure that any excess residue is eliminated, hold down the can’s nozzle and spray out the contents into an old rag until you do not hear any sound, not even air. Once the aerosol can is empty, many municipalities accept these items in the curbside recycling bin. For residents who do not have this option, these cans can be recycled free of charge at a number of recycling depots across the province. For more information on this program, visit the Recycle BC website, or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline.

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Electric outdoor power equipment is included in a provincial recycling program, managed by the Outdoor Power Equipment Institute of Canada (OPEIC). Included in this program are electric lawn mowers, trimmers, tillers, chain saws, and other equipment. For a complete list of accepted items, visit the OPEIC website. These items are accepted free of charge at a number of recycling depots across the province. To find your nearest drop off facility, visit the OPEIC Depot Locator, contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline, or check the RCBC Recyclepedia.

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The Automotive Recyclers’ Environmental Association (AREA) has developed a province-wide vehicle retirement program to ensure waste products from end-of-life vehicles are managed in accordance with all provincial and federal laws.

If your vehicle has been insured for the last 6 months, you may qualify for the BC SCRAP-IT program. This program offers a long list of incentives for trading in your old car, including: transit passes, bicycles, car-sharing memberships, or cash. Need more information?

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Many electronic items contain components that can cause environmental damage when thrown in the landfill. The ever-increasing amount of obsolete electronic equipment poses a real problem for solid waste management.

Need to recycle your old electronics? Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Oil Recycling FAQs

From motor oil to cooking oil, find answers to common questions on oil products below!

Larger amounts of used motor oil, oil filters, oil containers, antifreeze and antifreeze containers are eligible for pick-up through the BC Used Oil Management Association (BCUOMA).

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Used motor oil, oil filters, and oil containers are accepted through the BC Used Oil Recycling program, which is managed by the BC Used Oil Management Association (BCUOMA). The materials can be dropped off at various collection depots throughout the province, which include participating repair shops, car dealerships, and retailers. These collection facilities can accept residential amounts (approximately 10-15 litres) per visit, free of charge; please contact them ahead of time to ensure they have the storage capacity to handle the volume that you have.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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If your community has curbside collection for food scraps, small amounts of used cooking oil can be soaked up in used paper towels or newspaper and then added to your curbside organics bin. If you do not have curbside food scraps collection, small amounts of soaked up cooking oil would go into your household garbage. If you are not sure if your community has a food scraps collection program, please contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline.

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Vehicles & Parts Recycling FAQs

Vehicles and parts are widely repaired, reused, and recycled – see below for answers to common questions about these materials!

Larger amounts of used motor oil, oil filters, oil containers, antifreeze and antifreeze containers are eligible for pick-up through the BC Used Oil Management Association (BCUOMA).

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Used motor oil, oil filters, and oil containers are accepted through the BC Used Oil Recycling program, which is managed by the BC Used Oil Management Association (BCUOMA). The materials can be dropped off at various collection depots throughout the province, which include participating repair shops, car dealerships, and retailers. These collection facilities can accept residential amounts (approximately 10-15 litres) per visit, free of charge; please contact them ahead of time to ensure they have the storage capacity to handle the volume that you have.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Car and truck tires can be recycled through a province-wide program managed by Tire Stewardship BC. Up to four tires (off-rim) can be dropped off free of charge at a number of participating retailers.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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The BC Used Oil Management Association (BCUOMA) maintains a recycling program for used antifreeze and antifreeze containers. These products can be dropped off for free at participating retailers and automotive shops across the province.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Lead-acid (car) batteries can be recycled through a program managed by the Canadian Battery Association (CBA). Lead-acid batteries can be dropped off at a number of participating CBA depots across the province.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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The Automotive Recyclers’ Environmental Association (AREA) has developed a province-wide vehicle retirement program to ensure waste products from end-of-life vehicles are managed in accordance with all provincial and federal laws.

If your vehicle has been insured for the last 6 months, you may qualify for the BC SCRAP-IT program. This program offers a long list of incentives for trading in your old car, including: transit passes, bicycles, car-sharing memberships, or cash. Need more information?

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Paint Recycling FAQs

From house paint to paint aerosols, find answers to questions about paint products here.

Product Care Recycling operates over 200 depots throughout BC that accept leftover household paint for recycling. Each depot accepts 10 cans of paint per person, per day, provided that the paint is residential, in its original container with the original labeling, and is not leaking. Paint containers up to 23 litres (5 gallons) are accepted.

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No. Paint cans are not accepted through municipal recycling programs. In most areas, they are also banned from the garbage can. All paint cans, empty or full, should be taken to a Product Care Recycling depot for recycling.

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Some paint recycling depots also operate as Product Care PaintShare depots. Through this program, any leftover paint is set aside for others to pick up for free reuse.

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Solvents like paint thinner are subject to different regulations than paint. They are more dangerous than most paints and require different storage and handling facilities.

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Household Hazardous Waste Recycling FAQs

Household Hazardous Waste includes a range of materials that require special handling for safe disposal and cannot go into the garbage. You can find answers to common questions about these types of items here!

Solvents like paint thinner are subject to different regulations than paint. They are more dangerous than most paints and require different storage and handling facilities.

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Empty refillable and non-refillable propane tanks are accepted at most landfills and transfer stations for recycling as scrap metal.

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Empty aerosol spray cans, including those for food, air fresheners, shaving cream, hairspray and textile sprays, are included in a provincial recycling program, managed by Recycle BC. To ensure that any excess residue is eliminated, hold down the can’s nozzle and spray out the contents into an old rag until you do not hear any sound, not even air. Once the aerosol can is empty, many municipalities accept these items in the curbside recycling bin. For residents who do not have this option, these cans can be recycled free of charge at a number of recycling depots across the province. For more information on this program, visit the Recycle BC website, or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline.

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Lighting Products Recycling FAQs

Both light bulbs and light fixtures can be recycled at many recycling depots throughout BC, find answers to common questions about recycling lighting products below!

Product Care Recycling operates the province-wide program for fluorescent light tubes and compact fluorescent bulbs. This program also includes all other residential light bulbs such as incandescent, halogen, and light emitting diodes (LEDs).

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Product Care Recycling operates the province-wide program for fluorescent light tubes and compact fluorescent bulbs. This program also includes all other residential light bulbs such as incandescent, halogen, and light emitting diodes (LEDs). Residential drop-off depots can accept up to 16 bulbs and/or tubes at a time, in any shape or size up to 8 feet in length. These products are free to drop-off at designated retailers or recycling depots. To locate your nearest depot, call the RCBC Recycling Hotline or visit the RCBC Recyclepedia.

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Other Material Recycling FAQs

Find answers to common questions that don’t quite fit into a specific category here.

Disposable diapers were not designed for recycling. They contain many different materials (such as paper, plastic, and absorbent material) and are contaminated with human waste.

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For recycling metal coat hangers, one option may be to go through a local dry cleaner or thrift store.

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Plastic Recycling FAQs

Many types of residential plastic packaging are accepted through curbside blue-bin and depot drop off programs in BC, while recycling options for other plastics vary. Find answers to some of the most common questions about plastics below!

Brita Corporation has teamed up with TerraCycle and implemented a national recycling program for Brita filters. Used Brita filters can also be taken to most London Drugs locations across the province for free drop-off through their Green Deal Recycling program.

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Single-use pods are included in a recycling program in BC through an organization called Recycle BC. Through this program, many communities across the province accept these items in their curbside recycling, provided that the pods are emptied and rinsed out prior to recycling.

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Single-use coffee cups for hot and cold beverages are included in a province-wide recycling program managed by Recycle BC. Once these containers are empty and rinsed, many municipalities accept them in the curbside recycling collection program as containers (not as paper).

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Wax and plastic lined food containers are included in a provincial recycling program for packaging and printed paper in BC. This program is managed by a non-profit organization called Recycle BC. Common examples of these containers are those for ice cream, microwavable meals, and milk products. These containers are included in many curbside recycling programs in BC and can be placed with household containers (not paper) once they are free of food residue.

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Plastic bags and overwrap are included in a province-wide recycling program under Recycle BC. Included in this program are grocery and shopping bags, outer wrap for flats of beverage containers and diapers, garden product bags, and many more. For a complete list, visit the Recycle BC website. These items can be dropped off free of charge at a number of depot locations across the province. These items, once recycled, are turned into new plastic bags, plastic pallets, containers, or plastic decking material. Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

This program only includes plastic bags and overwrap from residents and does not include material from industry or commercial businesses. To see whether local options exist for commercial plastic recycling, contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline.

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If the bubble wrap is in reusable condition, we would recommend saving it for future use. Otherwise, bubble wrap is included in a provincial recycling program for residential packaging and printed paper, under a category called “Other Flexible Plastic Packaging.” This program is managed by an organization called Recycle BC.

These plastics are not included in the curbside recycling program but can be dropped off at a participating depot free of charge. For a complete list of locations, visit the RCBC Recyclepedia or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline.

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Residential polystyrene foam packaging is included in a provincial recycling program managed by Recycle BC. This includes foam polystyrene packaging (styrofoam) to protect appliances as well as foam take out and meat containers. For a complete list of accepted products, visit the Recycle BC website.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Residential polystyrene products such as egg cartons and meat trays are included in a province-wide recycling program managed by Recycle BC. Although this material is not accepted in most curbside recycling programs, it is accepted free of charge at a number of recycling depots in communities across the province.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Plastic and paper-fibre pots and trays, including those for seedlings, vegetable plants, and bedding plants, are included in a province-wide recycling program managed by Recycle BC.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Crinkly wrappers and bags are included in a province wide recycling program for packaging and printed paper under a category called “Other Flexible Plastic Packaging.” This program is managed by an organization called Recycle BC. This category would include wrappers for candy and cookies, cereal bags, potato chip bags, and other products. For a complete list of included items, please visit the Recycle BC website. These plastics are not included in the curbside recycling program, but can be dropped off at a participating depot free of charge. Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Battery Recycling FAQs

Many types of household and automotive batteries are included in province-wide recycling programs, find answers to common questions about battery recycling below!

Lead-acid (car) batteries can be recycled through a program managed by the Canadian Battery Association (CBA). Lead-acid batteries can be dropped off at a number of participating CBA depots across the province.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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The Call2Recycle program, funded by the battery and portable electronics industry, provides convenient drop-off locations for batteries throughout North America. All Call2Recycle drop-off depots in British Columbia will accept household alkaline batteries, as well as rechargeable batteries, free of charge.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Packaging Recycling FAQs

In BC, residential packaging is included in a province-wide program with certain materials collected through curbside recycling and others at recycling depots. Find answers to common questions about packaging here!

Single-use pods are included in a recycling program in BC through an organization called Recycle BC. Through this program, many communities across the province accept these items in their curbside recycling, provided that the pods are emptied and rinsed out prior to recycling.

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Single-use coffee cups for hot and cold beverages are included in a province-wide recycling program managed by Recycle BC. Once these containers are empty and rinsed, many municipalities accept them in the curbside recycling collection program as containers (not as paper).

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Wax and plastic lined food containers are included in a provincial recycling program for packaging and printed paper in BC. This program is managed by a non-profit organization called Recycle BC. Common examples of these containers are those for ice cream, microwavable meals, and milk products. These containers are included in many curbside recycling programs in BC and can be placed with household containers (not paper) once they are free of food residue.

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Plastic bags and overwrap are included in a province-wide recycling program under Recycle BC. Included in this program are grocery and shopping bags, outer wrap for flats of beverage containers and diapers, garden product bags, and many more. For a complete list, visit the Recycle BC website. These items can be dropped off free of charge at a number of depot locations across the province. These items, once recycled, are turned into new plastic bags, plastic pallets, containers, or plastic decking material. Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

This program only includes plastic bags and overwrap from residents and does not include material from industry or commercial businesses. To see whether local options exist for commercial plastic recycling, contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline.

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If the bubble wrap is in reusable condition, we would recommend saving it for future use. Otherwise, bubble wrap is included in a provincial recycling program for residential packaging and printed paper, under a category called “Other Flexible Plastic Packaging.” This program is managed by an organization called Recycle BC.

These plastics are not included in the curbside recycling program but can be dropped off at a participating depot free of charge. For a complete list of locations, visit the RCBC Recyclepedia or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline.

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Residential polystyrene foam packaging is included in a provincial recycling program managed by Recycle BC. This includes foam polystyrene packaging (styrofoam) to protect appliances as well as foam take out and meat containers. For a complete list of accepted products, visit the Recycle BC website.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Residential polystyrene products such as egg cartons and meat trays are included in a province-wide recycling program managed by Recycle BC. Although this material is not accepted in most curbside recycling programs, it is accepted free of charge at a number of recycling depots in communities across the province.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Plastic and paper-fibre pots and trays, including those for seedlings, vegetable plants, and bedding plants, are included in a province-wide recycling program managed by Recycle BC.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Crinkly wrappers and bags are included in a province wide recycling program for packaging and printed paper under a category called “Other Flexible Plastic Packaging.” This program is managed by an organization called Recycle BC. This category would include wrappers for candy and cookies, cereal bags, potato chip bags, and other products. For a complete list of included items, please visit the Recycle BC website. These plastics are not included in the curbside recycling program, but can be dropped off at a participating depot free of charge. Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Beverage Container Recycling FAQs

BC is home to North America’s oldest deposit-refund program for beverage containers. Find answers to common questions about beverage container recycling below!

Please rinse all containers clean. Do not crush your beverage containers.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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As of February 1st, 2022 there is a 10-cent deposit charged on “ready-to-drink” milk and plant-based beverages like oat, soy, and almond. The 10-cent deposit will be refunded when the empty containers are returned for recycling at Return-It sites across the province.

Consumers can still place their milk and plant-based beverage containers into their residential and curbside (blue box) recycling bin, but they will not be eligible for the 10-cent deposit refund paid at the time of purchase.

For more information, please visit the Return-It website. Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Yes. Alcoholic beverages, such as beer, wine, and spirits, are included in the deposit/refund recycling program. The deposit for alcoholic beverage containers is 10 cents.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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The Recycling Fee represents the cost of recycling the beverage container you purchased. Prior to the spring of 2000, this fee was incorporated into the price of the beverage. In order to educate consumers about the cost of the system, Return-It has encouraged retailers to show this fee as a separate item on your till receipt.

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Aseptic packaging containers of all types are included in a recycling program managed by Recycle BC. Through this program, tetra packs are included in many curbside recycling programs across the province. For those who cannot include them in their household recycling, there are also depots that accept them for free drop-off.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Recycling Services FAQs

Questions about curbside collection or other recycling services? Find answers to common questions here!

Most often food packaging belongs in your recycling bin rather than your organics bin. There are some cases, however, where paper packaging gets too soiled to go in with clean paper for recycling. If you get curbside collection for food scraps, some soiled paper products can go into your curbside organics bin. If you are not sure if your community has a food scraps collection program, please contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline.

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Many municipalities provide blue boxes or bags to their residents, provided that the recycling pick-up service is provided by your city. Many multi-family complexes receive pick-up from a private contractor due to different property tax structures.

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Organic Materials FAQs

Many communities are working to keep organics out of landfills through residential composting programs, and you can compost at home, too! See below for answers to common questions on organics!

Most often food packaging belongs in your recycling bin rather than your organics bin. There are some cases, however, where paper packaging gets too soiled to go in with clean paper for recycling. If you get curbside collection for food scraps, some soiled paper products can go into your curbside organics bin. If you are not sure if your community has a food scraps collection program, please contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline.

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Some cities have banned “clean and green” materials from the garbage. Composting organic yard trimmings conserves limited landfill space and produces a valuable resource! This material belongs in your backyard composter or municipal composting facilities, not the garbage. Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Accepted materials in municipal composting programs vary. Basic programs include only yard and garden waste such as leaves, branches, and grass clippings. More comprehensive programs accept food scraps as well, including fruits and vegetables, coffee grounds, tea bags, egg shells, bones, meat, fish, dairy, food-soiled cardboard, and baked goods.

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There are many benefits to keeping organic material out of the landfill. Engineered landfills are anaerobic environments, meaning they decompose without oxygen. When organic materials break down in anaerobic environments, methane gas is produced. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas and contributes directly to climate change.

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Pests and odours can be kept to a minimum with regular emptying and cleaning of your green bin. Remember you are not making more organic waste than before – just moving it into a different bin. Start with lining your kitchen catcher with newspaper, which absorbs liquids, prevents odours and make it easier to clean. Learn how here.

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If your community has curbside collection for food scraps, small amounts of used cooking oil can be soaked up in used paper towels or newspaper and then added to your curbside organics bin. If you do not have curbside food scraps collection, small amounts of soaked up cooking oil would go into your household garbage. If you are not sure if your community has a food scraps collection program, please contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline.

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Paper Recycling FAQs

A wide variety of paper products are accepted for recycling in programs across BC, find answers to common questions about paper below!

Phone books are fully recyclable. All curbside recycling programs accept phone books as mixed waste paper.

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Paperback and hardcover books are not included in the provincial recycling program as they are specifically excluded from Schedule 5 of the BC Recycling Regulation. Many of the curbside recycling programs in BC no longer include paperback books. Many charities do not want donations of encyclopedias and some textbooks since they are often outdated.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Shredded paper is included in curbside recycling programs in BC. To ensure that smaller pieces do not make a mess in your bin, it is best to contain the shredded paper in a bag. Certain municipalities in BC require shredded paper to be in a firmly tied, clear plastic bag, while others require shredded paper to be contained in a paper bag instead. To find out the guidelines in your area, please contact your municipality or call the RCBC Recycling Hotline.

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Single-use coffee cups for hot and cold beverages are included in a province-wide recycling program managed by Recycle BC. Once these containers are empty and rinsed, many municipalities accept them in the curbside recycling collection program as containers (not as paper).

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Electronics Recycling FAQs

Many electronics products are recyclable through BC-wide programs. See below for answers to many of the most common questions about electronics recycling.

Charitable organizations may accept electronics in good working order for resale or reuse. Since electronics become obsolete relatively quickly, most organizations can only accept electronics purchased in the last few years. Select organizations may be able to accept older electronics for reuse whenever possible. An individual in your community might also be interested in your working electronics. Contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for reuse options in your area.

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Charitable organizations may accept computer equipment in good working order for schools and other causes. Non-working or obsolete computers can be taken to a Return-It electronics recycling depot.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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BC’s Return-It Electronics is a province-wide, end-of-life electronics recycling program available to all consumers and businesses in British Columbia. For a full list of accepted materials visit the Return-It website. For information on your closest depot, or for recycling options on materials not covered under this program, visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Return-It Electronics accepts cell phones as part of the province-wide electronics recycling program. You can drop off any of the regulated products at designated collection sites and be assured they will be recycled responsibly.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Environmental Handling Fees (EHFs) reflect the cost of recycling the item you are purchasing. The collection of EHFs funds the recycling program, including depot operation, shipping and storage of collected electronics, and public education. For a complete list of the different Environmental Handling Fees charged on electronics, visit the Return-It website.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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End-of-life electronics, including audio and video systems, can be taken to a Return-It electronics recycling depot for recycling. To find the nearest drop off depot, call the RCBC Recycling Hotline or visit the RCBC Recyclepedia or Return-It website.

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End-of-life electronics, including non-mobile phones, cordless landline phones, and answering machines, can be taken to a Return-It electronics recycling depot for recycling.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Storage media that are not outdated can sometimes be donated to a local school, charity, or thrift store. There is also the option of listing these items on the Surrey Reuses website, or contacting the RCBC Recycling Hotline for possible reuse options in your area. If these items are ready for recycling, they can be taken to a Return-It electronics recycling depot.

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Many electronic items contain components that can cause environmental damage when thrown in the landfill. The ever-increasing amount of obsolete electronic equipment poses a real problem for solid waste management.

Need to recycle your old electronics? Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Reuse FAQs

Before the time comes for recycling, many items can be reused – find answers to common questions about reuse for a range of items below!

There are a number of salvage yards and reusable building material stores throughout the province. Contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for salvage yards and reuse stores in your community.

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Trophies can be difficult to recycle because they consist of a mix of materials.

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Charitable organizations may accept electronics in good working order for resale or reuse. Since electronics become obsolete relatively quickly, most organizations can only accept electronics purchased in the last few years. Select organizations may be able to accept older electronics for reuse whenever possible. An individual in your community might also be interested in your working electronics. Contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for reuse options in your area.

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Some charities and optometrists collect used eyeglasses for use in developing countries. Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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Charitable organizations may accept computer equipment in good working order for schools and other causes. Non-working or obsolete computers can be taken to a Return-It electronics recycling depot.

Visit RCBC’s Recyclepedia for drop-off options or contact the RCBC Recycling Hotline for all options available in your community.

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